St Juliana Book Club

I'm starting a new Saint Juliana Book Club. The goal is to read a book every month or so.


February 2020 Selection

Our inaugural book will be The Devil’s Advocate by Morris West.  A novel written in 1959, the story follows a dying English priest sent by the Vatican to investigate an individual being proposed for sainthood.  The book sold over three million copies, received several awards, and was staged on Broadway.  The New York Times called it “a reading experience of real emotional intensity.”Please obtain a copy of the book yourself.  For those interested and able, we will meet to discuss the book on Saturday, February 1st at 9:30am in the parish center.


March 2020 Selection

Our next book will be The Road  by Cormac McCarthy, to be discussed on Saturday, March 14th at 9:30am in the parish center.

FEAST OF OUR LORD JESUS CHRIST THE KING

Christ the King Sunday celebrates the all-embracing authority of Christ as King and Lord of all things. Officially called “The Feast of Our Lord Jesus Christ the King,” it is celebrated on the final Sunday of Ordinary Time, the Sunday before Advent.

Pope Pius XI instituted The Feast of Christ the King in 1925 for the universal church in his encyclical Quas Primas. He connected the increasing denial of Christ as king to the rise of secularism throughout Europe. At the time of Quas Primas, many Christians (including Catholics) began to doubt Christ’s authority and existence, as well as the Church’s power to continue Christ’s authority.

Pius hoped the institution of the feast would have various effects. They were:

1. That nations would see that the Church has the right to freedom, and immunity from the state (Quas Primas, 32).

2. That leaders and nations would see that they are bound to give respect to Christ (Quas Primas, 31).

3. That the faithful would gain strength and courage from the celebration of the feast, as we are reminded that Christ must reign in our hearts, minds, wills, and bodies (Quas Primas, 33).

When we celebrate Christ as King, we are not celebrating an oppressive ruler, but one willing to die for humanity and whose “loving-kindness endures forever.” Christ is the king that gives us true freedom, freedom in Him. Thus we must never forget that Christ radically redefined and transformed the concept of kingship.

All Souls Day

All Souls’ Day, is a day for commemoration of all the faithful departed, those baptized Christians who are believed to be in purgatory because they died with the guilt of lesser sins on their souls. It is observed on November 2. Roman Catholic doctrine holds that the prayers of the faithful on earth will help cleanse these souls in order to fit them for the vision of God in heaven, and the day is dedicated to prayer and remembrance. Requiem masses are commonly held, and many people visit and sometimes decorate the graves of loved ones.

Read more...

All Saints Day

Early History of Memorials for Martyrs and Saints

From the earliest days of the Church, Christians venerated martyrs on the anniversary of their deaths by celebrating Mass on their tombs. Over the next few centuries relics began to be transferred between dioceses and memorials for several martyrs were celebrated in common. During the persecutions of Diocletian in the early 300's so many Christians were killed that it became impossible to create separate memorials for each so joint memorials became common.

In the late 300s St. Basil the Great sent a letter to the bishops of Pontus inviting them to celebrate a common feast in honor of the martyrs.

The earliest record of a feast honoring all Christian martyrs  is from a homily of St. John Crysostom in the 407 saying that there was a feast celebrated in Constantinople.

All Saints Day in the Western Church

The first official recognition of a feast for all martyrs and the Virgin Mary comes in 609 or 610 on May 13th when St. Boniface IV concecrated the Pantheon as a church. The Pantheon had been given to the Church as a gift from Emperor Phocas. The feast coincided with the conclusion of the Pagan feast of Lemures which was celebrated to appease restless spirits.

Pope Gregory III (731-741) dedicated a chapel in St. Peter's Basilica to all saints during his reign. Louis the Pious made the celebration obligatory in the Frankish empire in 835 and Pope Gregory IV  officially declared that the Feast of All Saints Day was to be celebrated by the whole Church on November 1st in 837.

The octave of All Saints was added during the reign of Pope Sixtus IV (1471-1484).

The Feast of All Saints is a holy day of obligation in the Catholic Church.

All Saints Day in the Eastern Church

In the Eastern Church the feast followed an ancient tradition of celebrating a feast for all saints on the first Sunday following Pentecost. The feast gained “official” status during the reign of the Byzantine Emperor Leo VI (886-911). He built a church for his holy wife Empress Theophano and when told he couldn't dedicate it to her, dedicated it to “All Saints” in the hope that she might some day be named a saint and therefore be celebrated in the church.

The second Sunday following Pentecost is reserved for honoring local groups of saints.

All Saints in Architecture

The Pantheon in Rome was originally a Roman temple dedicated to all the gods. In 609 the Byzantine Emperor Phocas gave the temple to Pope Boniface IV who rededicated as the church of St. Mary and the Martyrs. Many remains of Christians who originally had been buried in the catacombs were transferred to the church and placed under the altar.

The Pantheon - Church of All Saints

All Saints in Music

Here is a traditional recitation of the Litany of All Saints.

 

All Saints Day

Early History of Memorials for Martyrs and Saints

From the earliest days of the Church, Christians venerated martyrs on the anniversary of their deaths by celebrating Mass on their tombs. Over the next few centuries relics began to be transferred between dioceses and memorials for several martyrs were celebrated in common. During the persecutions of Diocletian in the early 300's so many Christians were killed that it became impossible to create separate memorials for each so joint memorials became common.

In the late 300s St. Basil the Great sent a letter to the bishops of Pontus inviting them to celebrate a common feast in honor of the martyrs.

The earliest record of a feast honoring all Christian martyrs  is from a homily of St. John Crysostom in the 407 saying that there was a feast celebrated in Constantinople.

All Saints Day in the Western Church

The first official recognition of a feast for all martyrs and the Virgin Mary comes in 609 or 610 on May 13th when St. Boniface IV concecrated the Pantheon as a church. The Pantheon had been given to the Church as a gift from Emperor Phocas. The feast coincided with the conclusion of the Pagan feast of Lemures which was celebrated to appease restless spirits.

Pope Gregory III (731-741) dedicated a chapel in St. Peter's Basilica to all saints during his reign. Louis the Pious made the celebration obligatory in the Frankish empire in 835 and Pope Gregory IV  officially declared that the Feast of All Saints Day was to be celebrated by the whole Church on November 1st in 837.

The octave of All Saints was added during the reign of Pope Sixtus IV (1471-1484).

The Feast of All Saints is a holy day of obligation in the Catholic Church.

All Saints Day in the Eastern Church

In the Eastern Church the feast followed an ancient tradition of celebrating a feast for all saints on the first Sunday following Pentecost. The feast gained “official” status during the reign of the Byzantine Emperor Leo VI (886-911). He built a church for his holy wife Empress Theophano and when told he couldn't dedicate it to her, dedicated it to “All Saints” in the hope that she might some day be named a saint and therefore be celebrated in the church.

The second Sunday following Pentecost is reserved for honoring local groups of saints.

All Saints in Architecture

The Pantheon in Rome was originally a Roman temple dedicated to all the gods. In 609 the Byzantine Emperor Phocas gave the temple to Pope Boniface IV who rededicated as the church of St. Mary and the Martyrs. Many remains of Christians who originally had been buried in the catacombs were transferred to the church and placed under the altar.

The Pantheon - Church of All Saints

The Feast of the Assumption of Mary

"On November 1, 1950, Pope Pius XII solemnly proclaimed as a divinely revealed truth "that the Immaculate Mother of God, the ever-virgin Mary, on the completion of her earthly life, was assumed body and soul into heaven."

By the fifth century, August fifteenth was kept at Jerusalem as the Commemoration of the Mother of God. In the sixth century the feast of Mary's Falling Asleep spread throughout the East Finally in the eighth century the day was celebrated as the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary.

"For Roman Catholic Christians, the belief in the Assumption of Mary flows immediately from the belief in her Immaculate Conception. Catholic Christians believe that if Mary was preserved from sin by the free gift of God, she would not be bound to experience the consequences of sin—death—in the same way we do. Mary's assumption shows the result of this freedom from sin—the immediate union of her whole being with her Son Jesus Christ with God at the end of her life." 

The Encyclical Munificentissimus Deus, before defining the dogma, reviewed the increasing awareness of this truth over the centuries, recalled the words of Holy Scripture which the fathers and theologians used to support their considerations and underlined this dogma's harmony with many other truths of the faith, such as Christ's resurrection and our own." Lives of the Saints, Augustine Kalberer, O.S.B.

"Hence the revered Mother of God, from all eternity joined in a hidden way with Jesus Christ in one and the same decree of predestination, immaculate in her conception, a most perfect virgin in her divine motherhood, the noble associate of the divine Redeemer who has won a complete triumph over sin and its consequences, finally obtained, as the supreme culmination of her privileges, that she should be preserved free from the corruption of the tomb and that, like her own Son, having overcome death, she might be taken up body and soul to the glory of heaven where, as Queen, she sits in splendor at the right hand of her Son, the immortal King of the Ages." — Munificentissimus Deus, Pope Pius XII 

Munificentissimus Deus

Deiparae Virginis Mariae

Homily on the Solemnity of the Assumption

Called, Like Mary, to Be Filled with God's Word

"Mary's Immaculate Body was, in a sense, the origin of sanctification of all mankind. Her flesh was used to form the flesh of her Son; the flesh which he used on the Cross to destroy death and sin, and which he gave to us that we might rise from the dead. Was this flesh, Mary's flesh, Christ's flesh, the instrument of our redemption and resurrection, to be subject to the corruption of the grave?" — Rev. James M. Keane, O.S.M.

"The womb that bore Jesus Christ, the hands that caressed him, the arms that embraced him, the breasts that nourished him, the heart that so loved him — it is impossible to think that these crumbled into dust." — Father Canice, OFM Cap. 

The Assumption of Our Lady

Mary's Death and Bodily Assumption

The Vatican Council on the Assumption of Our Lady

Her Assumption Befits the Mother of God

"The spiritual powers receive her with honors due to God,
and she who is truly the Mother of Life departs unto life,
the lamp of Light which no man can approach, the salvation
of the faithful and the hope of our souls (The Feast of Dormition, Great Vespers, Lete, Tone 2*)."

"A woman clothed with the sun, and the moon was under her feet, and upon her head a crown of twelve stars."

Hymn of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary

The Crown of Twelve Stars

Beautiful, Glorious

Salve Regina

Novena Prayer for the Assumption of the Virgin Mary

Novena for the Solemnity of the Assumption

 

 

Feast of Corpus Christi

 

The Solemnity of the Most Holy Body and Blood of Christ, historically known by its Latin name, Corpus Christi, celebrates the Real Presence of Jesus Christ in the Holy Eucharist—Body, Blood, Soul, and Divinity. It is traditionally celebrated on the Thursday following the Solemnity of the Holy Trinity. The feast dates to the Middle Ages and originated with a visionary nun and a Eucharistic miracle.

THE STORY

In 1263 a German priest, Fr. Peter of Prague, made a pilgrimage to Rome. He stopped in Bolsena, Italy, to celebrate Mass at the Church of St. Christina. At the time he was having doubts about Jesus being truly present in the Blessed Sacrament. He was affected by the growing debate among certain theologians who, for the first time in the history of the Church, began introducing doubts about the Body and Blood of Christ being actually present in the consecrated bread and wine. In response to his doubt, when he recited the prayer of consecration as he celebrated the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass, blood started seeping from the consecrated host and onto the altar and corporal.

Fr. Peter reported this miracle to Pope Urban IV, who at the time was nearby in Orvieto. The pope sent delegates to investigate and ordered that host and blood-stained corporal be brought to Orvieto. The relics were then placed in the Cathedral of Orvieto, where they remain today (see photo below).

This Eucharistic Miracle confirmed the visions given to St. Juliana of Mont Cornillon in Belgium (1193-1258). St. Juliana was a nun and mystic who had a series of visions in which she was instructed by Our Lord to work to establish a liturgical feast for the Holy Eucharist, to which she had a great devotion.

After many years of trying, she finally convinced the bishop, the future Pope Urban IV, to create this special feast in honor of the Blessed Sacrament, where none had existed before. Soon after her death, Pope Urban instituted Corpus Christi for the Universal Church and celebrated it for the first time in Orvieto in 1264, a year after the Eucharistic Miracle in Bolsena.

Feast of the Holy Trinity

Human intelligence needs God's help to apprehend the inner reality of God.  Certainly, human reason can employ natural analysis to some extent to describe God in terms of causality and motion and goodness.  Saint Anselm, who models the universality of Christendom by being both an Italian and an Archbishop of Canterbury, said that "God is that, than which nothing greater can be conceived."

A house is a house because it houses.  But what is in the house is known only by entering it.  Since creatures cannot enter the Creator, he makes himself known by coming into his creation.  "No one has seen God at any time.  The only begotten Son, who is in the bosom of the Father, he has declared him" (John 1:18).

Had we invented the Trinitarian formula, it would be only a notion instead of a fact.  There are just three choices: to acknowledge what God himself has declared, to deny it completely, or to change it to what makes sense without God's help.  That is why most heresies are rooted in mistakes about the Three in One and One in Three.

Unitarianism, for example, is based on a Socinian heresy.  Mormonism is an exotic version of the Arian heresy.  Islam has its roots in the Nestorian heresy.  All three reject the Incarnation and the Trinity but selectively adopt other elements of Christianity.  Like Hilaire Belloc in modern times, Dante portrayed Mohammed not as a founder of a religion but simply as a hugely persuasive heretic, albeit persuading most of the time with a sword rather than dialectic.  These religions, however, are not categorically Christian heresies since "Heresy is the obstinate post-baptismal denial of some truth which must be believed with divine and catholic faith . . ."  (Catechism, 2089).  Only someone who has been baptized can be an actual heretic.

Cultures are shaped by cult: that is, the way people live depends on what they worship or refuse to worship.  A culture that is hostile to the Holy Trinity spins out of control.  In 1919, William Butler Yeats looked on the mess of his world after the Great War:

Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold;
Mere anarchy is loosed upon the world . . .

That is the chaotic decay of human creatures ignorant of their Triune God.  "The best lack all conviction, while the worst / Are full of passionate intensity."  But to worship the "Holy, Holy, Holy" God as the center and source of reality is to confound anarchy: "For in Him all things were created, things in heaven and on earth, visible and invisible . . . He is before all things, and in him all things hold together" (Colossians 1:16-17).

Pentecost Sunday

 

Pentecost celebrates the birthday of the Church, when the Holy Spirit came upon the Apostles in the Acts of the Apostles. Pentecost, the 50th and final day of the Easter Season, celebrates the outpouring of the Holy Spirit upon the Apostles in the book of Acts, ushering in the beginning of the Church. 50 Days after Jesus' resurrection (and 10 days after his Ascension), the apostles were gathered together, confused and contemplating their future purpose and mission. On Pentecost, a flame rested upon the shoulders of the apostles, and they began to speak in tongues (languages), by the power of the Holy Spirit. Thus Pentecost is a time for many Catholics and other Christians to celebrate two important realities: the Holy Spirit and the Church.

“Holy Spirit, Lord of Light,

From the clear celestial height,

Thy pure beaming radiance give.”

is the opening verse of the great Sequence hymn for Pentecost, “Veni Sancte Spiritus.

Please view the full taize version below and feel free to sing along... Come, Holy Spirit, Come!

We will be doing a special  Pentecost celebration following the Saturday 5:00pm Mass on June 8th
There will be an hour of Eucharistic Adoration in the Church, praying Evening Prayer, the Litany of the Holy Spirit, music & more.
We hope you will consider joining us to celebrate the birthday of the Church" and the coming of the Holy Spirit! 
 

 

Acts 2 

The Coming of the Holy Spirit

When the day of Pentecost had come, they were all together in one place. And suddenly from heaven there came a sound like the rush of a violent wind, and it filled the entire house where they were sitting. Divided tongues, as of fire, appeared among them, and a tongue rested on each of them. All of them were filled with the Holy Spirit and began to speak in other languages, as the Spirit gave them ability.

Now there were devout Jews from every nation under heaven living in Jerusalem. And at this sound the crowd gathered and was bewildered, because each one heard them speaking in the native language of each. Amazed and astonished, they asked, “Are not all these who are speaking Galileans? And how is it that we hear, each of us, in our own native language? Parthians, Medes, Elamites, and residents of Mesopotamia, Judea and Cappadocia, Pontus and Asia, 10 Phrygia and Pamphylia, Egypt and the parts of Libya belonging to Cyrene, and visitors from Rome, both Jews and proselytes, 11 Cretans and Arabs—in our own languages we hear them speaking about God’s deeds of power.” 12 All were amazed and perplexed, saying to one another, “What does this mean?” 13 But others sneered and said, “They are filled with new wine.”

Peter Addresses the Crowd

14 But Peter, standing with the eleven, raised his voice and addressed them, “Men of Judea and all who live in Jerusalem, let this be known to you, and listen to what I say. 15 Indeed, these are not drunk, as you suppose, for it is only nine o’clock in the morning. 16 No, this is what was spoken through the prophet Joel:

17 ‘In the last days it will be, God declares,
that I will pour out my Spirit upon all flesh,
    and your sons and your daughters shall prophesy,
and your young men shall see visions,
    and your old men shall dream dreams.
18 Even upon my slaves, both men and women,
    in those days I will pour out my Spirit;
        and they shall prophesy.
19 And I will show portents in the heaven above
    and signs on the earth below,
        blood, and fire, and smoky mist.
20 The sun shall be turned to darkness
    and the moon to blood,
        before the coming of the Lord’s great and glorious day.
21 Then everyone who calls on the name of the Lord shall be saved.’

22 “You that are Israelites,[a] listen to what I have to say: Jesus of Nazareth,[b] a man attested to you by God with deeds of power, wonders, and signs that God did through him among you, as you yourselves know— 23 this man, handed over to you according to the definite plan and foreknowledge of God, you crucified and killed by the hands of those outside the law. 24 But God raised him up, having freed him from death,[c] because it was impossible for him to be held in its power. 25 For David says concerning him,

‘I saw the Lord always before me,
    for he is at my right hand so that I will not be shaken;
26 therefore my heart was glad, and my tongue rejoiced;
    moreover my flesh will live in hope.
27 For you will not abandon my soul to Hades,
    or let your Holy One experience corruption.
28 You have made known to me the ways of life;
    you will make me full of gladness with your presence.’

29 “Fellow Israelites,[d] I may say to you confidently of our ancestor David that he both died and was buried, and his tomb is with us to this day. 30 Since he was a prophet, he knew that God had sworn with an oath to him that he would put one of his descendants on his throne. 31 Foreseeing this, David[e] spoke of the resurrection of the Messiah,[f]saying,

‘He was not abandoned to Hades,
    nor did his flesh experience corruption.’

32 This Jesus God raised up, and of that all of us are witnesses. 33 Being therefore exalted at[g] the right hand of God, and having received from the Father the promise of the Holy Spirit, he has poured out this that you both see and hear. 34 For David did not ascend into the heavens, but he himself says,

‘The Lord said to my Lord,
“Sit at my right hand,
35     until I make your enemies your footstool.”’

36 Therefore let the entire house of Israel know with certainty that God has made him both Lord and Messiah,[h] this Jesus whom you crucified.”

The First Converts

37 Now when they heard this, they were cut to the heart and said to Peter and to the other apostles, “Brothers,[i] what should we do?” 38 Peter said to them, “Repent, and be baptized every one of you in the name of Jesus Christ so that your sins may be forgiven; and you will receive the gift of the Holy Spirit. 39 For the promise is for you, for your children, and for all who are far away, everyone whom the Lord our God calls to him.” 40 And he testified with many other arguments and exhorted them, saying, “Save yourselves from this corrupt generation.” 41 So those who welcomed his message were baptized, and that day about three thousand persons were added. 42 They devoted themselves to the apostles’ teaching and fellowship, to the breaking of bread and the prayers.

Life among the Believers

43 Awe came upon everyone, because many wonders and signs were being done by the apostles. 44 All who believed were together and had all things in common; 45 they would sell their possessions and goods and distribute the proceeds[j] to all, as any had need. 46 Day by day, as they spent much time together in the temple, they broke bread at home[k]and ate their food with glad and generous[l] hearts, 47 praising God and having the goodwill of all the people. And day by day the Lord added to their number those who were being saved.

 

Catholic Schools Week 2019

Catholic Schools Week 2020

January 26–January 31

Open House

Sunday, January 26

Family Mass · 9:30am

Bake Sale - 8:00am - 2:00pm

School Open · 11:00am–2:00pm