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27 Jan

Ezra, Man of Law

Dear Parishioners,

I have to mention Ezra from our first reading, being the canon lawyer that I am.  Because, you see, Ezra is connected to the law and quite significant when it comes to establishing the foundation for church law.

Ezra lives about 450 BC during the Diaspora, or when the Jews were dispersed throughout the Middle East.  Jerusalem had been destroyed and many of the Jews taken into captivity in Babylon.  He is a scribe and priest (remember how Jesus confronts the scribes?).  He is sent by Artaxerxes, the King of Persia, who has conquered the area, back to Jerusalem to reestablish the Torah or the law to the Jews who were now living back in Israel. 

Ezra was commissioned for this project because he was a man of the law.  He had introduced to Jewish communities living outside of Israel to the customs of the faith.  These weren't just haphazard practices created by Ezra, but practices outlined in the law.  Following the law, therefore, connected these scattered Jewish peoples to the true faith.  They couldn't physically worship in Jerusalem.  But this didn't mean they still couldn't be Hebrews.  If they followed the law, their identity was established.  So, it wasn't political nationality, ethnic background, or even regular participation in the Jerusalem temple cult, but following the law that made them God's chosen people. 

27 Jan

St Juliana School Open House

  • 25 April 2019 |
  • Published in Events

 

 

 

 

Interested in attending the Open House? Please call (773) 631-2256 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. for more information or schedule a tour.

Interested in helping as a volunteer? Please click here to sign up.

 

 

20 Jan

The Gates of the Netherworld

The Holy Spirit moved mysteriously over the "waters" of the Piedmont region in Northern Italy over several decades in the 19th Century.  This was a tumultuous time for the church.  The pope had been imprisoned, the Papal States were confiscated by the new king of Italy, and the rise of nationalism led to the outright persecution of the clergy, parishes, and Catholic schools.  This was particularly the case in Germany with Otto von Bismarck.  The heresy of Jansenism had a negative impact on people, and there were still lingering anti-Catholic sentiments from the French Revolution.  The general population was skeptical of Catholicism.  God thus responded, producing a number of saints.  Never has there been so many saints from one area (around Turin) during one period of time.  Pope Francis has referred to them as the 'social saints.'  We have Saints John Bosco, Joseph Cafasso, Leonardo Murialdo, Luigi Orione, and Joseph Cottolengo.  There are others on their way to sainthood, such as Bruno Lanteri, Francis Faa di Bruno, and the 24-year-old Pier Giorgio Frassati..

Saint John Bosco, the "apostle to the youth" and founder of the Salesian Order was known for his great smile and exceptional love for all people.  Saint Joseph Cafasso was Bosco's close friend and the one who inspired Bosco with his pastoral visits to the suffering.  Saint Murialdo founded the Society of Saint Joseph, which looked after delinquent children, and Saint Orione, who was an apprentice to Bosco, founded the Hermits of Divine Providence, which tended to the poor and sick.  Saint Cottolengo likewise opened a home for the sick and orphans.   These holy priests won back the people's hearts to Catholicism and proved true Christ's claim that "the gates of the netherworld shall never prevail against the Church."

20 Jan

A Thousand Bottles of Wine

Dear Parishioners,

There is so much to reflect upon with the Wedding Feast of Cana.  This is our Gospel reading this Sunday, the 2nd Sunday of Ordinary Time.  Yes, we are officially back in Ordinary Time.  We will climb all the way up to the 8th week in Ordinary Time before switching to Lent at the beginning of March.

The water is symbolic of the Old Covenant.  Notice the water is specifically mentioned to be in "six stone water jars there for Jewish ceremonial washings." The relationship of the Jews to God in the Old Testament was not as vibrant as it could be.  Jesus transforms the water into wine; he transforms the faith.  Our relationship with God in the New Covenant is now something totally exhilarating and fulfilling.  This is the power of the Holy Spirit.  Notice our second reading is a description of all the gifts or charisms of the Holy Spirit. 

14 Jan

Divine Mercy Sunday

Please visit our Divine Mercy Presentation in the back of the Church. This presentation includes a painting of the (original) Divine Mercy on loan from our parishioners Agniezska Hanusiak and her husband. This will be on display until Divine Mercy Sunday.

Additional resources will be added including a Divine Mercy Novena booklet for those who wish to join us in the Divine Mercy Novena which starts on Good Friday and ends on Divine Mercy Sunday.

Please join us on Divine Mercy Sunday (Sunday After Easter) in Church for the Divine Mercy Sunday Prayer Service from 3:00pm to 4:00pm. During this service we will sing and pray the Divine Mercy Chaplet with the Exposition of the Blessed Sacrament.

The Divine Mercy Message and Devotion

The message of The Divine Mercy is simple. It is that God loves us – all of us. And, he wants us to recognize that His mercy is greater than our sins, so that we will call upon Him with trust, receive His mercy, and let it flow through us to others. Thus, all will come to share His joy.

The Divine Mercy message is one we can call to mind simply by remembering ABC:

A - Ask for His Mercy. God wants us to approach Him in prayer constantly, repenting of our sins and asking Him to pour His mercy out upon us and upon the whole world.

B - Be merciful. God wants us to receive His mercy and let it flow through us to others. He wants us to extend love and forgiveness to others just as He does to us.

C - Completely trust in Jesus. God wants us to know that the graces of His mercy are dependent upon our trust. The more we trust in Jesus, the more we will receive.

This message and devotion to Jesus as The Divine Mercy is based on the writings of Saint Faustina Kowalska, an uneducated Polish nun who, in obedience to her spiritual director, wrote a diary of about 600 pages recording the revelations she received about God's mercy. Even before her death in 1938, the devotion to The Divine Mercy had begun to spread.

The message and devotional practices proposed in the Diary of Saint Faustina and set forth in this web site and other publications of the Marians of the Immaculate Conception are completely in accordance with the teachings of Church and are firmly rooted in the Gospel message of our Merciful Savior. Properly understood and implemented, they will help us grow as genuine followers of Christ.

 

Spend time to learn more about the mercy of God, learn to trust in Jesus, and live your life as merciful to others, as Christ is merciful to you.

 

Events in the life and mission of St. Faustina


August 25, 1905

Helena Kowalska was born in Glogowiec, Poland; the third of ten children living off a small farm and her father's carpentry work.

August 27, 1905

Helena is baptized at St. Casimirís church in Swinice Warckie.

1912

At the age of seven, Helena hears a voice calling her to religious life.

1914

Helena receives first Holy Communion.

1917

Helena begins her primary education, which lasts only two and a half years.

1920

At age 15, Helena begins domestic work to support her large family.

1922

Helena returns home, announces a desire to enter convent; her parents oppose; she works two years to help support her family.

July 1924

Helena sees a vision of the scourged Christ who calls her to religious life.

Helena goes to Warsaw to search for a convent, and she works to support herself.

August 1925

Helena is accepted by the Congregation of the Sisters of Our Lady of Mercy; one month later she wants to leave for a stricter order.

April 30, 1926

Helena receives habit and her religious name Maria Faustina.

April 3, 1927

Sr. Faustina experiences spiritual dark night during novitiate.

April 16, 1928

On Good Friday, she is engulfed by the flame of Divine Love.

April 30, 1928

Sr. Faustina makes her first profession of temporary vows.

December 1928

Newly elected Mother General Michaela Moraczewska is source of help and comfort to Sr. Faustina during her religious life.

October 1928-30

Easily adaptable, Sr. Faustina is sent to work at various houses.

February 22, 1931

Sr. Faustina sees a vision of Jesus who tells her to paint His image.

May 1, 1933

Sr. Faustina takes her perpetual vows.

May 25, 1933

Sr. Faustina goes to Vilnius where she receives many mystical experiences and is assisted by Fr. Michael Sopocko, a wise spiritual director.

January 2, 1934

Sr. Faustina visits the artist Kazimirowski, who is to paint the image.

March 29, 1934

Sr. Faustina offers herself for sinners, especially those who lack trust.

June 1934

The painting of Divine Mercy is completed, but Sr. Faustina does not like it.

July 1934

Beginning of Sr. Faustina's illness; she begins writing the Diary under obedience.

April 28, 1935

(Feast of Mercy) Divine Mercy image is publicly venerated in Vilnius for the conclusion of the Jubilee Year of Redemption: January 8, 1936. Sr. Faustina informs the Bishop that Jesus requests the founding of an order.

May 11, 1936

Sr. Faustina goes to Krakow; guided by Fr. Andrasz SJ; her health deteriorates.

September 1937

Holy cards with the Divine Mercy image printed for first time.

September 1938

Sr. Faustina prepares herself for death, and she asks pardon of the Congregation.

October 5, 1938

Sr. Faustina makes final confession, and dies late in the evening.

October 7, 1938

Funeral of Sr. Faustina, burial at the convent cemetery.

1940-1941

Divine Mercy message spreads first among the victims of WWII.

April 1941

Fr. Joseph Jarzebowski, MIC, brings the Divine Mercy message to the USA and the Congregation of Marians of the Immaculate Conception begins to spread the message in Polish.

1942-1959

The Divine Mercy message spreads worldwide through the efforts of the Marians, who publish images and literature in many languages.

March 6, 1959

Holy Office issues a notification banning Divine Mercy devotion.

October 21, 1965

Informative Process of Sr. Faustina's life and virtues is opened by Cardinal Karol Wojtyla, Archbishop of Krakow, encouraged by Cardinal Ottaviani, the Prefect of the Holy Office.

September 1967

Informative Process closes; Cardinal Wojtyla sends acts to Rome, January 31, 1968. The process of Beatification of Sr. Faustina is inaugurated.

April 15, 1978

Prefect of Sacred Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith declares the Notification ban no longer binding.

October 16, 1978

Cardinal Karol Wojtyla becomes Pope John Paul II.

July 12, 1979

Marians receive an authoritative explanation of the Notification issued by the Prefect for the Doctrine of Faith stating that no impediments exist in the spread of the message and devotion to the Divine Mercy in the forms proposed by Sr. Faustina.

May 1980

Marians publish critical edition of Sr. Faustina's Diary in Polish.

November 30, 1980

Pope John Paul II issues encyclical on the Divine Mercy.

November 22, 1981

Pope John Paul II visits the Shrine of Merciful Love in Collevalenza near Todi, Italy, stating that, "Right from the beginning of my ministry in St. Peter's See in Rome, I considered this message (of Divine Mercy) my special task."

1986

Marians publish critical edition of Sr. Faustina's Diary in English.

April 10, 1991

Pope John Paul II links the encyclical's message to Sr. Faustina.

March 7, 1992

Decree of Heroic Virtues of Sr. Faustina is promulgated.

December 1992

Miracle through intercession of Sr. Faustina is accepted.

April 18, 1993

Sr. Faustina beatified in Rome on Second Sunday of Easter.

January 2000

Second miracle through Bl. Faustina intercession is accepted.

April 30, 2000

Bl. Faustina is canonized in Rome on Divine Mercy Sunday and Divine Mercy Sunday is proclaimed.

May 5, 2000

Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments issues a Decree proclaiming the Second Sunday of Easter also as Divine Mercy Sunday.

December 2000

The Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments listed the Devotion to the Divine Mercy in its Directory on Popular Piety and the Liturgy: Principles and Guidelines.

April 22, 2001

Divine Mercy Sunday is celebrated officially for the first time by the universal Church.

May 13, 2001

Congregation For The Clergy issues a document: "Priest of God, you embody the Mystery of Mercy."

August 18, 2002

John Paul II consecrates the whole world to the Divine Mercy from The Divine Mercy Sanctuary in Krakow-Lagiewniki, the site of St. Faustina's tomb.

August 21, 2002

Decree of the Apostolic Penitentiary issued on Indulgences attached to devotions in honor of Divine Mercy.

 

How To Pray the Chaplet of Divine Mercy

 
Optional Opening Prayers:

You expired, Jesus, but the source of life gushed forth for souls,
and the ocean of mercy opened up for the whole world.
O Fount of Life, unfathomable Divine Mercy,
envelop the whole world and empty Yourself out upon us.

(Repeat 3 times) O Blood and Water, which gushed forth from the Heart of Jesus as a fountain of Mercy for us, I trust in You!

Our Father, Hail Mary and the Apostle's Creed

For each of the five decades (On each “Our Father” bead of the rosary, pray)

Eternal Father, I offer you the Body and Blood, Soul and Divinity of Your Dearly Beloved Son, Our Lord, Jesus Christ, in atonement for our sins and those of the whole world.

(On each of the 10 “Hail Mary” beads, pray)
For the sake of His sorrowful Passion, have mercy on us and on the whole world.

Concluding prayer (Repeat 3 times)
Holy God, Holy Mighty One, Holy Immortal One, have mercy on us and on the whole world.

Optional Closing Prayer
Eternal God, in whom mercy is endless and the treasury of compassion inexhaustible, look kindly upon us and increase Your mercy in us, that in difficult moments we might not despair nor become despondent, but with great confidence submit ourselves to Your holy will, which is Love and Mercy itself.
13 Jan

Christ's Heart Beats Loudly

Adapted from the homily delivered this past Christmas...

When Christ was born, a drumbeat entered into existence.  Beforehand, there was silence; no beat to give people a cadence and to excite them.  For that is the twofold purpose of a drum sound.  An army marching will often do so to the rhythm of a drummer.  This keeps the soldiers in line.  If the pace of the beat rises, the army charges.  The drumbeat not only quickens the feet, it also quickens the heart.  There is something primordial about a drum that produces adrenaline and energizes us.  See a football team coming out of the locker room to the drummer of the marching band.  Listen to a rock song with a great drum solo or sequence, like Happy Jack by The Who.  Or, if you want to stick to Christmas music, The Little Drummer Boy.  Originally known as 'The Carol of the Drums' this song is all about the poor shepherd boy pleasing the Holy Family with his drumming, since he has nothing else to offer.  Bob Seger has a great version of this Christmas carol.  If rock is not to your taste, you could listen to 'The Hallelujah Chorus' in Handel's Messiah, which utilizes the timpani masterfully.  This is not a sad or dull piece.

Christ has provided the drumbeat for us.  If we are to receive genuine excitement and joy and not fall astray in life, we ought to listen and march to this beat.  Henri Nouwen writes, "Discernment is a life of listening to a deeper sound and marching to a different beat, a life in which we become 'all ears'."  Prayer is one way we listen to the drums.  The Mass is another.  Christ's heart beats loudly in the Eucharist. 

For 2,000 years God has been drumming.  It is not only for us to this Christmas to be attuned and 'rock out', but also our Church, founded on a rock

 

13 Jan

What's the Significance of the Dove?

Letters from a Pastor to His People- January 13, 2019

Dear Parishioners,

"And the Holy Spirit descended upon him in bodily form like a dove" (Lk 3:22).  What's the significance of the dove?

We know now that the dove is one of the forms or images of the Holy Spirit. But for the crowd witnessing Jesus' baptism in the Jordan, they would not have picked up on this.  They simply would have seen a bird flying in the sky that happened to hover above this young adult.  The Old Testament made no mention of God being a bird.  But there are, however, some Old Testament references to the dove, and I'd like to use these to unpack the dove's significance in the Baptism of our Lord.

Noah releases a dove during the flood to determine if dry land has appeared; if the flood waters have begun to recede (cf. Gen 8:8).  It first returns with an olive branch and then, at last, it never returns, indicating to Noah that the land is once again habitable, as the dove is able to settle on it.    

Christ is the new man, representative of the new creation.  He emerges from the waters, just as that new land upon which Noah's dove settled emerged from the flood waters.  Jesus is the new people of God, emerging from water as Moses and the Israelites emerged from the Red Sea waters free from sin.

08 Jan

School Closed

  • 25 April 2019 |
  • Published in Events

SCHOOL CLOSED TOMORROW: 
WEDNESDAY JANUARY 9TH

As you are aware our school boiler that was upwards of 50 years old had unexpectedly failed prior to Christmas break. While in the process of replacing the boiler, asbestos was required to be removed. We have been working expeditiously to complete this project in rapid time. 

We have been blessed with unseasonable warm weather, which has enabled us to keep school open with minimal disruption to our classrooms. Our new boiler should be fully installed and functioning by some time tomorrow morning, however, temperatures are expected to drop significantly. Having said this, it will take time for the classrooms to get back up to normal temperatures and we want to ensure the safety and productivity of our students in their classrooms. 

As a result, school will be closed tomorrow, Wednesday January 9th. School is expected to resume on Thursday morning. While we realize this is an inconvenience, we appreciate your understanding. We will provide additional information as it becomes available.

 
06 Jan

With God, All Things Are Possible Even Time Travel

In discussing the Eucharist, Saint Thomas Aquinas writes, "This sacrament has a threefold significance: with regard to the past...with regard to the present...with regard to the future..." (ST III, 73.4). The movie Back to the Future comes to mind.

If you have never seen the 1980s cult classic movie trilogy, time travel is the subject.  A high school student travels to the 1950s and interferes with the events, thus altering the future.  When he returns back to the present, it is no longer the present as he left it.  Some terrible events have also happened in the future, and so the main character and his sidekick must travel back to the past and then back to the future to correct the situation.  It is easier to watch than describe.

"With God all things are possible" (Matt 19:26) and God makes 'time travel', in a sense, possible with the Eucharist (not the flux capacitor).  When we celebrate Mass on Sunday, three time periods are being invoked and affected.  With regard to the past, Mass is the re-presentation of Christ's sacrifice on Calvary 2,000 years ago.  His sacrifice that led to our redemption is placed anew upon the altar at Catholic parishes around the world.  With regard to the present, Mass is communion.  We are united to Jesus right now and to the church, both members here on earth and those in Heaven. With regard to the future, the Mass is the participation in a banquet occurring in Heaven.  It will draw us to Heaven, which is why we sometimes refer to the Eucharist as viaticum

When we go to Mass we are, as theologian Peter Kreeft puts it, "bilocating, not just in space but in time."  I hope you enjoy the presentation.

Has a bright beam of sunlight ever drawn your eye to our stained glass windows, and you found yourself wondering what story they tell? They really do tell a story; we share it with our virtual tour.

Church Windows