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16 Oct

REBOOT! Live

  • 25 March 2019 |
  • Published in Events

GOD DIDN'T CREATE US TO JUST GET BY, HE CREATED US TO LIVE LIFE TO THE FULL!

Let internationally renowned speaker and author Chris Stefanick help you REDISCOVER God, and REDISCOVER the life you were made for. REBOOT! is the fun, inspiring and practical experience for all, of applying the beauty and genius of the Gospel to every aspect of your life, from prayer and spirituality, to work, dating, marriage, parenting, health and more!

It’s time to start living the Life you were made for.

JOIN US Wednesday, October 16, 2019 7:00pm - 9:30pm to see Chris Stefanick LlVE. 

 

Buy Your Tickets Online Now.

 

TICKETS ARE $25 EACH AND INCLUDE PRODUCT VALUED AT OVER $40!

The $25 ticket purchase includes admission to this dynamic event as well as the following materials:

1. Select copies of Chris’s new books

2. Special edition REBOOT workbook

3. Real Life Catholic pen

 

24 Mar

God is Fire

Dear Parishioners,

I'm like a Neanderthal when it comes to fire.  I'm mesmerized by it.  Now, I'm not saying I'm a pyromaniac.  All you firefighters in the parish, don't give me the evil eye when you next see me.  I'm just saying there is something so primeval and fascinating to me about a burning fire.  Am I that crazy? I'm sure you all enjoy sitting in front of and staring at a fire in your fireplace.  I know the Boy Scouts enjoy making fires--they did so at their Webelos Crossover Event (when Cub Scouts enter Boy Scouts) last week. 

I don't think I'm in horrible company with this fascination with fire.  Moses liked it too. See the burning bush from the first reading (cf. Exodus 3).  This theophany ('appearance of God') had to be incredibly fascinating. Not only is God fire, which is intriguing in itself, he is fire that does not consume. 

This is more than just a fake fireplace (I hate fake fireplaces by the way...I want to build my own fire!).  This is something 'remarkable', as Moses himself commented. 

God is fire.  He is mesmerizing, appealing, and heartening.  And he does not consume.  There is nothing we lose when God comes more fully into our hearts.  We only gain. 

Firefighters should love this image of God.  Think of a fire that does not destroy.  What more could you want!

24 Mar

The Edge of Sadness

The Edge of Sadness by Edwin O'Connor won the Pulitzer Prize for fiction in 1962.  Set in a New England town, it is a story of priesthood and an Irish-American family scenario with which most people could probably resonate.

Father Hugh Kennedy is the protagonist of the story.  He and his best friend, Father John Carmody, are middle-aged pastors.  They battle their demons of darkness, both related to their fathers.  Kennedy slipped into alcoholism after his father's slow and painful death, and Carmody a general misanthropy stemming from his father's challenging nature that meant a difficult upbringing.  You might already be thinking, 'This sounds depressing. Why would I read this?' Because it is a beautiful story that provides profound psychological insights.

Kennedy realizes that a genuine prayer life was non-existent in his active life as a young priest.   He was not tapped into the "continuing current of love," as he describes it.  Kennedy says:

What the priest may not see is that he stands in some danger of losing himself in the strangely engrossing business of simply 'being busy'; gradually he may find that he is rather uncomfortable whenever he is not 'being busy.' 

The problems of priesthood are not all that dissimilar from the married or single life.  The heart of a priest's identity is his love of God.  Everything else in his ministry comes second.  If he falls away from his heart, his life will begin to disintegrate.  Likewise, if a married couple falls away from the essence of their love and is swept up into the current of 'busyness', their relationship will deteriorate. 

The story is hopeful, for Kennedy is able to re-center himself in God and persevere in the priesthood.  If we find ourselves on the edge of sadness, may we do likewise.

 

17 Mar

Create Your Own Prayer

It can be beneficial, every now and again, to create your own blessing or prayer.  We do not always need to rotely recite the ones provided by the Church.  Creating your own prayer, which is certainly a valid thing to do, puts you in the company of the Trinity.  God, of course, is a creator and a ‘blesser’.  If we are called to be like God, then we can create our prayers.

Here is an example of someone's created prayer.  Maybe it can inspire you.  It is "A Blessing for March's Saints" by Andrew Greeley:

May you dance a reel for St. Paddy's sake

And toast the many united in one

May St. Joseph guard you as soon as you wake

And safely lead you home when day is done

From Aquinas may you learn wisdom and truth

And from Gregory tradition's faithful way

May Casimir teach you courage and hope

And Gabriel surprise you each new day

Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.

Or, "A Blessing for March Seventeenth" by the same:

May it be a grand day for all of you

Be ye Irish or as Patrick as you'd like to be

May your jars be limited to just a few

May you revel in God's great diversity

In a land where Moslem, Protestant, Catholic, Jew

Enjoy a constitutional variety

Modestly raise a quiet cry and hue

To give thanks for peaceful ethnicity

And praise for pluralism's brightest jewel

Drink joyous toasts, in all sobriety

To the one from many ‘neath red, white and blue

And may God bless you this glorious day

The Father who holds the world together

The Son who walked among us

And the spirit who makes each of us unique

17 Mar

The Contemplative Life

Dear Parishioners,

There are some who think there is no place for the contemplative life in Christianity.  Quiet, interior prayer is an aberration.  To be a Christian, they would say, means to serve our brothers and sisters.  Jesus did remark, after all, "whatever you did for one of these least brothers of mine, you did for me" (Matthew 25:31-46).  When we are just praying like monks, we are not serving anyone.  Hence, there is no room for recollected prayer.  That takes us away from the mission of Christ.  Such is the claim.

I brought up this argument in my first talk on prayer a couple weeks ago.  There are many flaws in that argument; many ways to rebut it.  The Transfiguration, which we read about this weekend, is one such way.

Jesus climbs Mount Tabor with his apostles, Peter, James and John (the three whom he will take apart with him in the Garden of Gethsemane). He is elevated and experiences a mystical encounter with Moses and Elijah.

Yes, Moses represents the Law and Elijah represents the Prophets, but they also both represent interior, contemplative prayer.  Moses for 40 days was on Mount Sinai, communing silently with God.  He was immersed in a sort of luminous cloud, which the Hebrews called the shekinah.  When Moses comes down the mountain after 40 days, his countenance is changed.

17 Mar

Barb Ernat

Throughout one's spiritual journey there are often significant life-events that test our relationship with God. Often times when we are faced with a devastating setback we think that God has abandoned us and often get angry with God.

6 years ago I lost my mother to Alzheimer’s disease, and as so many caregivers experience, the journey was very challenging for our family.  As I cared for my mother I was dealing with some challenges of my own.  I often found myself asking: Why me? Why us? Why, God, are you giving me more than I can bear?

I found comfort from Robin Roberts, of Good Morning America, in her book “Everybody’s Got Something”.  She reminds readers that everyone carries burdens and hardships.   For her it was a harrowing medical diagnosis and the subsequent difficult journey through it.  Her journey was hard but there were so many that gave her hope.  In her words, everyone’s got something, but everyone’s got something to give as well.  

What I realized as I looked back at my own challenges is that all the times that I thought God wasn’t there he was actually revealing himself through so many people in my life.  It was my circle of friends, family and even strangers who gave so much; they made me realize that God was indeed everywhere around me.

As Christians we are called to carry out God’s work so that in someone’s darkest days they are able to see God through us and have hope that there are better days ahead.

A faith community brings a sense of kinship, a comfort of knowing that we are all in this together.  Maybe this Sunday you came to church with something to give or maybe you came to find hope.   Each Sunday we get an invitation to receive a smile, a kind word, an uplifting scripture, a heartfelt homily.  Sometimes we don’t even realize we need these unintentional gifts.  But they are here for the taking. 

Barb Ernat, a mom to St. Juliana preschoolers Tom and Jack, works in corporate marketing and together with her husband Ray have been members of St. Juliana for the last two years.  

14 Mar

Irish Family Mass Homily

From the homily for the Irish Family Mass in Honor of Saint Patrick, 3/14/2019

 The theme of this year's St. Patrick's Day Mass, Irish literature, is most fitting.  We cannot think of St. Patrick and the Emerald Isle apart from books.  Two of the greatest writers from the last two hundred years were Irish and Catholic: James Joyce and Oscar Wilde.  Joyce's own sister was a nun—Sister Gertrude Mary Joyce—and Thomas Merton said he owed his conversion to Catholicism from reading Joyce.

The roots of Irish literature begin with Saint Patrick himself.  When Patrick escaped from slavery in Ireland and returned to his native Britain, he had a dream in which a man named Victorinus appeared.  Victorinus gave Patrick letters to read, letters that would inspire Patrick to return to the place of his captivity and evangelize it.  But before he could do this, Patrick had to prepare.  He crossed the channel to France and there trained under St. Martin of Tours, the Roman soldier-turned monk.  Schooled in prayer and theology, Patrick was given a spiritual discipline that would serve him and his companions well.  The great Irish saints—Brendan, Kevin, Columba, Columbanus, Columbkille, Killian—would travel around Ireland, founding monasteries and instilling in the people a life of prayer and study.

Has a bright beam of sunlight ever drawn your eye to our stained glass windows, and you found yourself wondering what story they tell? They really do tell a story; we share it with our virtual tour.

Church Windows