Deacon Robinson Ortiz

Parts of the Mass (3)

Today, I’m going to talk about the third part of the Mass.

3. Liturgy of the Eucharist

Presentation of the Gifts: Representatives of the congregation bring forth the bread and wine that will become the Body and Blood of Christ. The ushers bring forth the collection.

The Eucharistic CelebrationPreparation of the Altar: The altar servers bring the Roman Missal (book with prayers), chalices (cups for wine), ciboriums (vessels with hosts), bread, wine, and water to the altar. The deacon or the priest pours wine into the chalices and adds a drop of water into the celebrant’s chalice. This mingling of water and wine signifies the union of Christ’s divinity and humanity.

Eucharistic Prayer: This is the center and high point of the entire celebration. In this prayer, the celebrant acts in the person of Christ as head of his body, the Church. It includes the following eight elements:

Parts of the Mass (2)

Today, I’m going to talk about the second part of the Mass.

2. Liturgy of the Word

First Reading: On Sundays, this reading is usually taken from one of the books of the Old Testament, except in the season of Easter. The place used by the lectors to read the Scriptures at Mass is called the ambo.

Responsorial Psalm: After the First Reading, a cantor sings the Psalm chosen according to the liturgical celebration. The congregation participates in the meditation of the Word of God by singing the response to the Psalm.

Second Reading: This reading is always taken from one of the Letters in the New Testament. The book that lectors use to proclaim the Word of God at Mass is called the Lectionary. At the end of the First and Second Readings, the assembly honors the Word of God just received by responding, “Thanks be to God.”

Gospel Acclamation: The assembly, standing, sings the Alleluia, followed by a verse from the Scriptures. The Alleluia is sung every Sunday of the liturgical year, except in Lent.

Parts of the Mass (1)

Today and for the next four Sundays, we’ll be highlighting the various parts of the Mass in this column. These short explanations will hopefully enlighten your understanding of each unique moment in our liturgical celebration and help encourage you to participate in a more conscious way, uniting your voice to that of the whole community of St. Juliana, to praise, adore and give thanks to God.

The Mass is divided into four basic parts: Introductory Rites, Liturgy of the Word, Liturgy of the Eucharist, and Concluding Rites.

1. Introductory Rites

The Entrance: When people are gathered, the commentator reads the opening comment that introduces the faithful to the Mass of the day. Then, as the priest, deacon and ministers enter into the church, the Entrance Chant or hymn begins. The Altar Servers carry the processional cross and the candles. The deacon (or the lector when there is no deacon) carry the Book of the Gospels.

Holy Days of Obligation

Catholics are expected to attend Mass every Sunday because “the Eucharist is the foundation and confirmation of all Christian practices,” as it is written in the Catechism of the Catholic Church, paragraph 2181. Our communal participation in the Sunday Eucharist is also “a testimony of belonging and of being faithful to Christ and to his Church.” Thus, Sunday is the primordial holy day of obligation. However, there are other days of obligation every year, such as the Immaculate Conception, the Nativity of the Lord, Mary Mother of God, the Epiphany, the Ascension of the Lord, Corpus Christi, the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary, and All Saints. Some of these celebrations have been moved to Sunday in order to promote the participation of the faithful, while others remain on the specific dates on which they have been established.

Season of Advent

Today we celebrate the Second Sunday of Advent. The season of Advent began in the evening of Saturday, December 2nd and will end in the afternoon of December 24th. Side note: Notice that the season of Christmas in the Church doesn’t end on December 25th, but it starts on that day.

The Liturgical Year

Happy New Liturgical Year!

Sunday, December 3, 2017, marks the beginning of a new liturgical year and a new liturgical season. The liturgical calendar for Sundays is divided into three years: A, B, and C. Each year we read in a special way one of the Synoptic Gospels: Matthew, Mark, and Luke. What about John? We read the Gospel of John for special celebrations, such as the Passion of the Lord on Good Friday and during the season of Easter. Today, we begin year B, and on Sundays we will be reading from the Gospel of Mark, excerpts from Luke, and chapter 6 of John.

Hello from Deacon Robinson

My name is Robinson Ortiz, I’m 26 years old, and I was born in Colombia. I finished my philosophy studies in the Seminary of Bogota and then taught in a high school for a year. In 2013, I came to Chicago to study English at UIC and in August 2014, I joined Mundelein Seminary. During my time in the seminary, I have been assigned to Holy Name Cathedral, St. Dismas Parish in Waukegan, and St. Damian Parish in Oak Forest. I also did my Clinical Pastoral Education at Tampa General Hospital for 11 weeks last Summer. My classmates and I went to a 9-week pilgrimage in the Holy Land this year where we visited the holy sites and had Scriptural and Ecumenical classes.