30 Dec

Pop Quiz - Who Was The First Saint?

Dear Parishioners,

Pop quiz! Who was the first saint?

  1. a) St. Joseph
  2. b) St. John the Baptist
  3. c) St. Michael the Archangel
  4. d) St. Stephen the Martyr
  5. e) The Holy Innocents

Okay, I know it's Christmas Break and you weren't prepared, so I'll be merciful. No need to call the Cardinal to complain and ask for a redo.  I'll accept any of your answers.  For one could make a theological and historical argument for each of the above. 

But, if we had to choose, (and the answer I usually tell the students in school), I would say: e) The Holy Innocents.

We celebrated the Feast of the Holy Innocents this past week on December 28.  If you are not familiar with the Holy Innocents, these are the children in Bethlehem who were murdered by King Herod as a result of Jesus' birth.  "When Herod realized that he had been deceived by the magi, he became furious. He ordered the massacre of all the boys in Bethlehem and its vicinity two years old and under, in accordance with the time he had ascertained from the magi (Matt 2:16)."

30 Dec

Theotokos of Vladimir

The Theotokos of Vladimir is an icon written (icons are technically 'written' not 'painted') in the year 1130 in Constantinople and is currently in the Tretyakov Gallery in Moscow.  Theotokos means 'bearer of God,' and there are series of Theotokos icons, of which our present study is a part, called the Eleusa icons.  Eleusa means tenderness.  And so this image is sometimes referred to as 'The Virgin of Tenderness.'

Mary is holding Jesus delicately, while staring, if you notice, directly at us.  Mary wants a relationship with us.  We will be fulfilled if we do.  It is also as if Mary wants us to have the same desire for her as her Son does.  There is a lot of significance in those eyes.  Mary's tender and penetrating eyes are always upon us.  This is a beautiful thing.  We never want a mother and a lady's gaze to drift elsewhere.  We are possessive of the feminine attention.  Mary satisfies our need.      

The infant appears as if he is trying to climb Mary, to get as close to her as possible. A sandal of Jesus has even fallen off (see the right foot) in his haste to fly unto his Mother.  Mary is cooperative with this effort.  Her left hand seems to be pushing Jesus upwards. You will also notice Jesus' right hand on the face of Mary.  He has wrapped his arm around her neck--another sign of affection.  Our Lord embraces Mary.  The faces of mother and son are touching as well.  Great intimacy is present in that physical connection.  And Jesus, of course, is looking directly into the eyes of his mother. 

If there are times in our life we do not believe Jesus is looking at us, chances are he is looking at us through the eyes of his tender Mother. 

 

30 Dec

Seminarian Ankit Jose Mathews (Joseph)

Dear St. Juliana family

I’m writing this note to inform the St. Juliana family that I will be moving to another parish starting this January. I’ll be transitioning to St. Mary’s Syro-Malabar Knanaya Catholic Parish, Morton Grove to continue my pastoral formation, starting with my internship.

It has been a pleasure to be part of this great family. I’ll be making this transition so that I can take part in the Syro-Malabar Liturgy and be formed in that tradition. The Syro-Malabar Church is one of the 22 Eastern Catholic Church groups that is in full communion with the Pope.

It was truly a blessing to work with our pastor, Fr. James Wallace, who is a great mentor for all seminarians who come to St. Juliana Parish. I am also thankful to Fr. Laurent who guided me when I was assisting the RCIA program last year, and it was an immense joy to co-teach CCD at St. Juliana with Fr. Emmanuel. I am also thankful to Fr. Roger for his words of wisdom and encouragement.

I would also like to show my gratitude to all my fellow seminarians who are also part of St. Juliana Parish, and who were a great support for me personally. I am also remembering the Teaching Parish Program Committee members who were always encouraging toward me. I would like to thank everyone at the St. Juliana family for their care and concern. Please continue to pray for me as I’m making this transition. I will also continue to pray for all of you.

Ankit Jose Mathews (Joseph)

Second Theology

26 Dec

The Solemnity of Mary Mother of God - January 1st

The Story of Mary, Mother of God

Mary’s divine motherhood broadens the Christmas spotlight. Mary has an important role to play in the Incarnation of the Second Person of the Blessed Trinity. She consents to God’s invitation conveyed by the angel (Luke 1:26-38). Elizabeth proclaims: “Most blessed are you among women and blessed is the fruit of your womb. And how does this happen to me, that the mother of my Lord should come to me?” (Luke 1:42-43, emphasis added). Mary’s role as mother of God places her in a unique position in God’s redemptive plan.

The precise title “Mother of God” goes back at least to the third or fourth century. In the Greek form Theotokos—God-bearerit became the touchstone of the Church’s teaching about the Incarnation. The Council of Ephesus in 431 insisted that the holy Fathers were right in calling the holy virgin Theotokos. At the end of this particular session, crowds of people marched through the street shouting: “Praised be the Theotokos!” The tradition reaches to our own day. In its chapter on Mary’s role in the Church, Vatican II’s Dogmatic Constitution on the Church calls Mary “Mother of God” 12 times.

The Solemnity of Mary Mother of God falls exactly one week after Christmas, the end of the octave  of Christmas. It is fitting to honor Mary as Mother of Jesus, following the birth of Christ. When Catholics celebrate the Solemnity of Mary Mother of God we are not only honoring Mary, who was chosen among all women throughout history to bear God incarnate, but we are also honoring our Lord, who is fully God and fully human. 

Calling Mary "mother of God" is the highest honor we can give Mary. Just as Christmas honors Jesus as the "Prince of Peace," the Solemnity of Mary Mother of God honors Mary as the "Queen of Peace."  On this holy feast day, let us take a moment as we start our new year to honor our Blessed Mother, who in her “yes” to God brought our Savior into the world to redeem us. 


Join us for Mass to Honor Mary, Mother of God:

New Year's Eve  - Vigil  5:00pm
New Year's Day - 7:30am and 9:30am

26 Dec

The Feast of the Epiphany - January 6th

About Epiphany

At Epiphany, the Church celebrates the manifestation of the Son of God as the Savior and Messiah. Also called Three Kings Day, at Epiphany we recall the visit of the Magi to the newborn Jesus: “And behold, the star that they had seen at its rising preceded them, until it came and stopped over the place where the child was. They were overjoyed at seeing the star, and on entering the house they saw the child with Mary his mother. They prostrated themselves and did him homage. Then they opened their treasures and offered him gifts of gold, frankincense, and myrrh.” (Matthew 2:9–12)

The epiphany, or showing, of Jesus teaches us that Jesus’ coming into the world was important to the whole world and that the Good News of Jesus Christ is meant for everyone!

Symbols

Various paintings, artworks and sketches show the three wise men and Jesus. Some paintings artworks show the three wise men on the way to Bethlehem or adoring baby Jesus. The kings are important because their visit illustrates that Jesus was the king of all kings.

The star that guides the wise men to Christ also symbolizes Epiphany, as well as the three gifts they gave to Jesus:

  • Gold (fit for a king).
  • Frankincense (used to worship at a temple).
  • Myrrh (used for embalming).

 

Blessing of the Home and Household on Epiphany

When all have gathered, a suitable song may be sung. The leader makes the sign of the cross, and all reply, “Amen.”

The leader greets those present in the following words:

Let us praise God, who fills our hearts and homes with peace.
Blessed be God forever.
R/. Blessed be God forever.

In the following or similar words, the leader prepares those present for the blessing:

The Word became flesh and made his dwelling place among us. It is Christ who enlightens our hearts and homes with his love. May all who enter this home find Christ’s light and love.

One of those present or the leader reads a text of sacred Scripture, for example, Luke 19:1-9:

Listen to the words of the holy Gospel according to Luke:


Jesus came to Jericho and intended to pass through the town. Now a man there named Zacchaeus, who was a chief tax collector and also a wealthy man, was seeking to see who Jesus was; but he could not see him because of the crowd, for he was short in stature. So he ran ahead and climbed a sycamore tree in order to see Jesus, who was about to pass that way.> When he reached the place, Jesus looked up and said to him, “Zacchaeus, come down quickly, for today I must stay at your house.” And he came down quickly and received him with joy. When they all saw this, they began to grumble, saying, “He has gone to stay at the house of a sinner.” But Zacchaeus stood there and said to the Lord, “Behold, half of my possessions, Lord, I shall give to the poor, and if I have extorted anything from anyone I shall repay it four times over.” And Jesus said to him, “Today salvation has come to this house because this man too is a descendant of Abraham.”

The intercessions are then said:

Leader: The Son of God made his home among us. With thanks and praise let us call upon him.
R/. Stay with us, Lord.
Leader:  Lord Jesus Christ, with Mary and Joseph you formed the Holy Family: remain in our home, that we may know you as our guest and honor you as our Head.
We pray:
R/. Stay with us, Lord.
Leader:  Lord Jesus Christ, you had no place to lay your head, but in the spirit of poverty accepted the hospitality of your friends: grant that through our help the homeless may obtain proper
housing.
We pray:
R/. Stay with us, Lord.
Leader:Lord Jesus Christ, the three kings presented their gifts to you in praise and adoration: grant that those living in this house may use their talents and abilities to your greater glory.
We pray:
R/. Stay with us, Lord.

After the intercessions the leader invites all present to say the Lord’s Prayer.
The leader says the prayer of blessing with hands joined:

Lord God of heaven and earth,
you revealed your only-begotten Son to every nation
by the guidance of a star.
Bless this house
and all who inhabit it.
Fill them (us) with the light of Christ,
that their (our) concern for others may reflect your love.
We ask this through Christ our Lord.
R/. Amen.

The leader concludes the rite by signing himself or herself with the sign of the cross and saying:

May Christ Jesus dwell with us,
keep us from all harm,
and make us one in mind and heart,
now and forever.
R/. Amen.

It is preferable to end the celebration with a suitable song, for example, “O Come, All Ye Faithful” or “We Three Kings.”

—From Catholic Household Blessings & Prayers

The United States Conference of Catholic Bishops is pleased to share a downloadable lectio divina resource for the Feast of the Epiphany of the Lord.

 

26 Dec

Feast of the Holy Family - December 30th

The Feast of the Holy Family is dedicated to the Holy Family of Jesus, Mary and Joseph, commemorating their life together in Nazareth and calling us to focus on Catholic family life. The Church presents the Holy Family to us as a model for our own family life. Joseph was the head of the Holy Family and provided for Mary and Jesus with the work of his hands. He was obedient to the angel who told him to take Mary as his wife, what to name the new child and again when told to flee with them to Egypt. He taught Jesus the carpentry trade and what it was to be a man in the society in which they lived.

Mary took care of her family in the home. It was she who would have taught Jesus the Scriptures and prayers of their people when he was very young. It was through her example of managing the home that Jesus would formulate many of the examples he would later use in his teaching. Jesus saw work sanctified through the example of his earthly parents, who did all things well in the ordinary circumstances of daily life.

As far back as St. John Chrysostom, Christians were urged to make of their home a family church in which the family members would find their sanctification. That was to be accomplished by putting Christ at the center of all individual and family life, by working and praying together, reading the Scriptures and worshiping as a unit.

In his Apostolic Exhortation, Familiaris consortio, 60, Pope John Paul said:

“Do you teach your children the Christian prayers? Do you prepare them, in conjunction with the priests, for the sacraments that they receive when they are young – Confession, Communion and Confirmation? Do you encourage them, when they are sick, to think of Christ suffering, to invoke the aid of the Blessed Virgin and the saints? Do you say the family Rosary together…? Do you pray with your children, with the whole domestic community, at least sometimes? Your example of honesty in thought and action, joined to some common prayer, is a lesson for life and an act of worship of singular value. In this way you bring peace to your homes: Pax huic domui. Remember, it is thus that you build up the Church.”

In 2002, Pope John Paul II stated in his Angelus talk of December 29, “A united family that follows these principles will more easily overcome the trials and difficulties it encounters on its way. In the faithful love of the parents, a gift ceaselessly to foster and safeguard, children can find the best conditions for their growth, helped by Jesus who “increased in wisdom and in stature, and in favor with God and man (Lk 2:52).” Catholics are encouraged to learn what the Church teaches about marriage and family life.

The United States Conference of Catholic Bishops is pleased to share a downloadable lectio divina resource for the Feast of the Holy Family. 

26 Dec

Thank You Christmas 2018

THANK YOU FOR JOINING US THIS CHRISTMAS 2018 - THE JESUS EXPERIENCE IS STRONG HERE AT ST JULIANA - GOD BLESS YOU ALL!

CHRISTMAS MASS 

CHRISTMAS PLAY WITH OUR VERY OWN RELIGIOUS EDUCATION CHILDREN AT THE 3:00 PM CHRISTMAS VIGIL MASS 

THE HISTORY OF THE SAINT JULIANA CRECHE (Inside)

In 1975, three “handymen”, a teacher, a salesmen and a graphic designer, got together in a basement workshop to remodel Saint Juliana’s Crèche. Wally (Walter) Powers, a un-named salesman, and Larry Dombrowski, decided to make it easier to put-up, collapse and store. That beautiful Crèche lasted 43 years. Unfortunately, it had begun to show it’s age.

With some experience in designing commercial displays and theatre sets, Larry, one of the original designers, re-designed and built a new home for the seven superbly carved wood statues we see each Christmas season. With the contemporary materials available today, it is designed for much easier assembly and storage. The new Crèche has been built to last another 40 years. This year, it was set up by Larry, his grandson Joshua Plier and a team of fellow parishioners.

This holiday season, we are proud to unveil our new home for the Holy Family. Thank you Larry Dombrowski for nearly 50 years of faith, love and commitment to the Saint Juliana Parish Family.

 

THE SAINT JULIANA CRECHE (Outside)

 

 

Music Ensembles

Christmas Eve

3:00pm - Children's Ensemble - from Choir Loft

5:00pm - Catherine Keating, Cantor
 
10:00pm - Schola and Chamber Orchestra - from Sanctuary
 
 
Christmas Day
 
7:30am - Glenn deCastro, Cantor
 
9:30am - Parish Choir, Bell Choir and Chamber Orchestra - from Choir Loft
 
11:00am - Carol Zalinski, Cantor; Mixed Chorus and Chamber Orchestra - from Choir Loft
 
 
 
 
Santa goes to School - HO-HO-HO - Merry Christmas!
 
 
 
Friendship Club Fun at the Annual Christmas Party
 
 
 
    
   
 
 
 
 
 
Bingo Fun at the Annual Ugly Sweater Contest
 
 
Knights of Columbus Fun at the Annual Christmas Fundraiser
24 Dec

Christmas 2018

  • 06 December 2019 |
  • Published in Events

THANK YOU FOR JOINING US THIS CHRISTMAS 2018 - THE JESUS EXPERIENCE IS STRONG HERE AT ST JULIANA - GOD BLESS YOU ALL!

CHRISTMAS MASS 

CHRISTMAS PLAY WITH OUR VERY OWN RELIGIOUS EDUCATION CHILDREN AT THE 3:00 PM CHRISTMAS VIGIL MASS 

THE HISTORY OF THE SAINT JULIANA CRECHE (Inside)

In 1975, three “handymen”, a teacher, a salesmen and a graphic designer, got together in a basement workshop to remodel Saint Juliana’s Crèche. Wally (Walter) Powers, a un-named salesman, and Larry Dombrowski, decided to make it easier to put-up, collapse and store. That beautiful Crèche lasted 43 years. Unfortunately, it had begun to show it’s age.

With some experience in designing commercial displays and theatre sets, Larry, one of the original designers, re-designed and built a new home for the seven superbly carved wood statues we see each Christmas season. With the contemporary materials available today, it is designed for much easier assembly and storage. The new Crèche has been built to last another 40 years. This year, it was set up by Larry, his grandson Joshua Plier and a team of fellow parishioners.

This holiday season, we are proud to unveil our new home for the Holy Family. Thank you Larry Dombrowski for nearly 50 years of faith, love and commitment to the Saint Juliana Parish Family.

 

THE SAINT JULIANA CRECHE (Outside)

 

 

Music Ensembles

Christmas Eve

3:00pm - Children's Ensemble - from Choir Loft

5:00pm - Catherine Keating, Cantor
 
10:00pm - Schola and Chamber Orchestra - from Sanctuary
 
 
Christmas Day
 
7:30am - Glenn deCastro, Cantor
 
9:30am - Parish Choir, Bell Choir and Chamber Orchestra - from Choir Loft
 
11:00am - Carol Zalinski, Cantor; Mixed Chorus and Chamber Orchestra - from Choir Loft
 
 
 
 
Santa goes to School - HO-HO-HO - Merry Christmas!
 
 

 
Friendship Club Fun at the Annual Christmas Party
 
 
 
    
   
 
 
 
 
 
Bingo Fun at the Annual Ugly Sweater Contest
 
 
Knights of Columbus Fun at the Annual Christmas Fundraiser
23 Dec

A Christmas Tree Blessing

Dear Parishioners,

I have discussed the meaning of the Christmas Tree before.  Its origins go back to St. Boniface, who chopped down a giant oak tree that pagans in Germany were worshiping.  He proved to them that the Christian God was more powerful than the fake, pagan gods confined to a tree.  If the local people needed a tree to facilitate their worship of the one, true God, then they should look to an evergreen tree.  Triangular in shape, like an image of the Trinity, the tree points upward to heaven and its evergreen leaves, which are everlasting, represent the eternity of God. 

I'm sure most of your Christmas trees are up already in your homes.  Traditionally, however, the tree was put up right before Christmas and remained in place until the feast of the Epiphany on January 6th. 

Your tree may be up, but have you blessed it yet?  No, this isn't a ploy to invite myself over to your house for dinner.  You don't need a priest to bless it.  Anyone in the family can do the blessing.  Doing the blessing on Christmas Eve, perhaps before you have your dinner, could be the perfect family activity! 

23 Dec

Behold! I Make All Things New

On October 21st, 1892, the United States celebrated the 400th anniversary of Columbus' discovery of the new world.  The year-long celebration, declared by President Benjamin Harrison, was highlighted by the World's Columbian Exposition held in Chicago, which ran from May 1 until October 30, 1893.  The monumental fair, which drew more than 27 million visitors, was a symbol of America's industry, innovation, and exceptionalism.  And so it was fitting that Czech composer Antonin Dvorak, considered one of the world's greatest musicians, performed at the fair.  Conducting the Chicago Symphony in front of a crowd of 8,000, Dvorak received a two-minute ovation.

Dvorak had recently composed his Symphony No.9 in E Minor. 'The New World Symphony' is a uniquely American symphony.  Dvorak made it for the United States and based it off of American melodies, also having been inspired by American poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow.

The United States at the time was still considered 'the new world.' It no longer is.  We might be the 'first world,' but we are not new.  Catholicism, which has been around far longer than the United States, is, paradoxically, the 'new world.'  "Then I saw a new heaven and a new earth" (Revelation 21:1).

We are the new world, and we always will be.  "Behold, I make all things new," says our Lord (Rev 21:5).  This is because our 'old worlds' constantly end.  When an individual Catholic turns away from a particular sin, deepens his prayer life, learns about a mystery of the faith, or matures morally, his apocalypse has come and he enters a new world.  Something similar happens for the Church at large each era. 

We likely will not hear the famous final movement of the New World Symphony this Christmas.  But this feast can, indeed, be the ushering in of a new world.