Till We Have Faces

C.S. Lewis' fairy tale, which would be his last novel, Till We Have Faces, has a brilliant discourse towards the climax.  The main character, Orual, is confronting the gods, whom she feels have gravely wronged her.  She at last comes to the realization why she feels abandoned: 

I saw well why the gods do not speak to us openly, nor let us answer. Till that word can be dug out of us, why should they hear the babble that we think we mean? How can they meet us face to face till we have faces?

Orual understands the issue lies not so much with God, but with herself.  She has not allowed herself to have a specific face for the gods to engage with.  She has hidden herself.  She has not owned her true identity, with all of its blessings and pains.  She has forced herself to be almost anonymous, and so it is no fault of the gods that they cannot help her. 

This is a crucial reality to grasp when it comes to pain and suffering in our lives.  If we want to make some sense out of suffering, and particularly to have God speak to us and comfort us, we need to give ourselves a face.  If we do not acknowledge our specific pain, and resulting anger with God, we are faceless.  But if we do, then we are a real person and God can love us.  It is the same reason why a husband and wife must articulate to one another why they are hurt.

Meister Eckhart wrote, "To get at the core of God at his greatest, one must first get into the core of himself at his least." We, in a way, are the key to opening the door to God.

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